Tech-X Worldwide Simulation Summit

September 21-22

2022

Plasma discharge simulation, plasma etching demo on laptop.

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Exciting Days

The Tech-X Worldwide Simulation Summit (TWSS) is a free event open to all members of our global user community. Held in beautiful Boulder, Colorado, TWSS features a comprehensive lineup of workshops and webinars led by our team of experts.

At TWSS2022, you will:

  • Learn new simulation techniques directly from the physicists and engineers who developed them.
  • Hear about the latest research being done with VSim from our scientific team and from other users in our global community.
  • Preview new features and capabilities currently under development.
  • Participate in hands-on workshops and potentially receive
    individualized coaching from our application engineers (on-site attendees only).

The final TWSS agenda is tailored to the preferences of each session’s attendees. Risk-free 30-day evaluation licenses of the latest version of VSim will be available to all attendees so that they may follow along with the presenters. Users who would like to share their simulation work with the VSim user community are invited to propose presentation topics.

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Confirmed TWSS2022 Presentation Topics Include:

  • Exploring the Fundamental Physics of Cavities Magnetrons with VSim- Dr. Andy Yue
  • Using VSim to model low-temperature gas discharge- Dr. Tom Jenkins
  • 3-D CFDTD PIC Simulation of a Dielectric-loaded RectangularWaveguide for THz Wave Generation- Dr. Ming-Chieh Lin
  • Using VSim to Optimize your Magnetron Sputtering Setup-Daniel Main

Examples of previous TWSS talks include:

  • Wafer Etching with Plasma Processing Methods
  • Modeling Corona Discharge
  • Phased Array Antennas
  • Multipacting

To see the full list of videos from previous TWSS events, click the link below to visit the Tech-X YouTube page.

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Save Your Spot For TWSS2022

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Tech-X Corporation Physics Simulation of a Dipole Above Conducting Plane